Development of New Therapeutics

Pherin’s research efforts are focused on those aspects of the chemistry, molecular biology and pharmacology of pherines that hold promise for development into efficacious and safe therapeutic applications. The Company’s scientific advisors and consultants provide ongoing advice as well as carry out projects in support of company objectives in their areas of expertise.

 

Pherines as Pharmaceutical Products

Pherin has discovered a new class of molecules termed pherines, and has gathered a large body of human data that indicate these compounds can have significant applications as pharmaceuticals. Pherines are not ingested or injected, but rather are self-administered by the patient with a metered nasal spray. Once they have been administered intranasally, Pherines modulate the activity of the limbic areas of the brain and the hypothalamus and have a rapid onset of efficacy.

Pherines affect key areas of the brain. These compounds do not need to circulate in the bloodstream in order to produce an effect. Instead, they initiate neural impulses that are transmitted by specific pathways that directly and rapidly affect brain function.

 

Properties of Pherines
    • Act locally on nasal receptors
    • Rapid onset of efficacy
    • Systemic absorption not required
    • Active at ultra low dose (nanogram or low picogram)
    • Excellent safety profile

Pherines affect key areas of the brain. These compounds do not need to circulate in the bloodstream in order to produce an effect. Instead, they initiate neural impulses that are transmitted by specific neural circuits that directly and rapidly affect brain function.

As a consequence of binding to receptors, Pherines can influence the regulatory functions exerted by the limbic amygdala and hypothalamus. These regulatory functions are potential therapeutic targets for pherines.

Pherine Brain Activation

Brain activation induced by a pherine in a human subject, revealed with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). The orientation of brain images (at left) is shown top to right. Images 1 and 2 had no activation and are not shown. Images 3-8 in the three conditions (sham, low concentration, high concentration) are shown from top to bottom, respectively. A robust increase in activation from the low concentration to the high concentration conditions is evident. Regarding regions of interest, activation is evident in the cingulated gyrus (images 3-8), in the inferior frontal gyrus (images 4-8), in the hypothalamus (image 5), in the limbic amygdala (image 6), in the thalamus (images 7-8).